A Stranger in Paradise


Online, I typically go by the name Holly Hobgoblin. This blog usually contains reblogs dedicated to either social politics, Broadway musicals, paganism, or medieval stuff, simply because those are the areas that usually interest me the most.

Ask me anything

mayakern:

seasonal fashion according to me

god i hate summer

Tagged: yupcomicnudity

Source: mayakern

Anonymous asked: You know what I find funny? That people had to legit ask if walt and matt were a couple but everyone's just so sure about insisting that Luke and Nick are a thing. Fucking christ this fandom got real stupid real fucking fast.

uldred:

dude holy shit that is the RAW TRUTH

like damn, i didn’t even notice that

but yeah for real this fandom is fucking dumb

Just goes to show that fandoms will always care more about seeing two young white dudes make out than about actual canon queer representation. 

Would it be interesting if it were revealed in the upcoming episodes that Nick and Luke did actually harbor feelings for each other? Yes. It would add an extra dynamic to their relationship, and I would love to see more non-heterosexual characters in video games. But, it’s pretty telling that the actual gay couple is questioned and overlooked because one of the guys involved isn’t conventionally attractive.

Tagged: the walking deadtwdgtwdg nukeshippingrepresentationI actually suspect that Telltale's going to reveal something along those lines for those twobecause otherwise what was that comment from Kenny about?fandom drama

theofficialariel:

Tink and Peter go on an adventure

Tagged: videovineDisneyhumor

Source: theofficialariel

fuckyeahrichardiii:

just a PSA to arthurian enthusiasts everywhere:

Modern readers, I’ve found, are much more quick to condemn L&G’s adulterous relationship than medieval writers were. 

Every damn time I teach Malory, students keep falling back on the argument “but if it wasn’t for those two, the whole house of cards wouldn’t have collapsed!” 

Because Mordred and Aggravayne hatch a plot to catch L&G. That’s the catalyst that gets everything started. It’s like a domino death effect from there. There’s one horrific, accidental death (Gareth’s) that arguably serves as an even more significant instigator, but I’ll deal with that in another post.

"But how can you not see this as awful? I mean Lancelot is sleeping with his best friend’s WIFE! And Guinevere is CHEATING on the KING!"

We can condemn, and judge, and look down our noses all we want. That’ll never change the fact that Malory doesn’t condemn them, or judge them, or blame them. And that’s the rub. Malory. Never. Does. You know who else doesn’t?

Arthur.

For Malory, at least, adultery isn’t really on the radar as an especially sinful, immoral behavior. Lancelot does penance during Quest of the Sankgreal because he’s done all of his heroic deeds for the sake of the queen, and not for God. I think there’s a mention of immorality, but it pales in comparison to the main point, which is that Lancelot has his priorities out of order, and is attached to worldly things (the queen being the main one) too much in comparison to things of the spirit.

Yeah, fine, adultery and other lustful stuff is considered sinful, and punishable by law sometimes. In terms of morality, though, it’s chump change compared to what we see other characters struggling with.

It saddens me to see modern readers so hung up on what they consider sexual immorality that they gloss over, or miss entirely, a lot of other awful, cruel behavior (Aggravayne, Mordred), or a lot of emotionally driven, destructive acts that people will commit when they’re in tremendous emotional pain (Gawain), or the paralysis, despair, and passivity that comes with being older, being broken, and having to watch the work of your hands fall to pieces in front of you (Arthur himself).

Tagged: medievalMiddle AgesArthurian legend

Gods, I hate nihilism.

medievalistsnet:








Least of the laity: the minimum requirements for a medieval Christian 



This article investigates the minimum level of religious observance expected of lay Christians by church authorities, and the degree to which legislation and procedures attempted to enforce these stan- dards.1 Once baptized, a person entered the community of the faithful; and the medieval church was as much accountable for the health and salvation of the ignorant, the ambivalent, the disobedient or distracted as they were of the devout. From the twelfth century, theologians, clerical authorities and the laity turned with concerted enthusiasm to the question of lay observance, advancing high ideals for lay commitment and expanding opportunities for lay participation. Yet while acting to elucidate and advance these quali- ties, the church was nevertheless mindful of the number of Christians who might fail to reach even basic standards. The resulting balance of the ideal and the possible, and the degree to which it reached and was enforced upon the less-enthusiastic laity is explored here through expectations for knowledge, observance of sacraments, and participation in regular duties such as church attendance, tithe-paying and fasting. The result was a complex ideal of lay observance that was balanced by a tolerance of laxity and even failure, and a system which increasingly exhorted specific expectations but was hesitant to define contumacy or disobedience in many but the most obdurate or scandalous cases.



 

medievalistsnet:

Least of the laity: the minimum requirements for a medieval Christian 

This article investigates the minimum level of religious observance expected of lay Christians by church authorities, and the degree to which legislation and procedures attempted to enforce these stan- dards.Once baptized, a person entered the community of the faithful; and the medieval church was as much accountable for the health and salvation of the ignorant, the ambivalent, the disobedient or distracted as they were of the devout. From the twelfth century, theologians, clerical authorities and the laity turned with concerted enthusiasm to the question of lay observance, advancing high ideals for lay commitment and expanding opportunities for lay participation. Yet while acting to elucidate and advance these quali- ties, the church was nevertheless mindful of the number of Christians who might fail to reach even basic standards. The resulting balance of the ideal and the possible, and the degree to which it reached and was enforced upon the less-enthusiastic laity is explored here through expectations for knowledge, observance of sacraments, and participation in regular duties such as church attendance, tithe-paying and fasting. The result was a complex ideal of lay observance that was balanced by a tolerance of laxity and even failure, and a system which increasingly exhorted specific expectations but was hesitant to define contumacy or disobedience in many but the most obdurate or scandalous cases.

 

Tagged: medievalMiddle Ageshistoryreferenceresourcesacademiachristianity

discardingimages:

screaming snailXenophon, Retreat of the Ten Thousand (French translation), France ca. 1501.
BnF, Français 701, fol. 46r

discardingimages:

screaming snail

Xenophon, Retreat of the Ten Thousand (French translation), France ca. 1501.

BnF, Français 701, fol. 46r

Tagged: medieval people and snails manmiddle agesmedieval

Tagged: Wonder Womancomicsdc

Source: docmuerte

Pushing Daisies Masterpost

leonardbonesy:

Season One

S1E1 Pie-lette
S1E2 Dummy
S1E3 The Fun In Funeral
S1E4 Pigeon
S1E5 Girth
S1E6 Bitches
S1E7 Smell Of Success
S1E8 Bitter Sweets
S1E9 Corpsicle

Season Two

S2E1 Bzzzzzzzzz!
S2E2 Circus, Circus
S2E3 Bad Habits
S2E4 Frescorts
S2E5 Dim Some Lose Some
S2E6 Oh Oh Oh… It’s Magic
S2E7 Robbing Hood
S2E8 Comfort Food
S2E9 The Legend Of Merle McQuoddy
S2E10 The Norwegians
S2E11 Window Dressed to Kill
S2E12 Water & Power
S2E13 Kerplunk

Tagged: pushing daisiesreference

Source: leonardbonesy

assemblyfairytale:

Forest Spirit by Amy Brown

assemblyfairytale:

Forest Spirit by Amy Brown

Tagged: fantasyarthorned goddessinspiration

Source: assemblyfairytale